Shrub Planting, by Ryan Teelander

We are planting in Michigan but the procedure should be used anywhere and this planting procedure can be used for both shrubs and trees.

Step 1. Choose a plant appropriate for the location or location appropriate for the plant.

Step 1. Choose a plant appropriate for the location or location appropriate for the plant.

Step 2. Start Digging the hole using a good shovel.

Step 2. Start Digging the hole using a good shovel.

Step 3. Dig the hole two to three times as wide as the root-ball and just as deep.

Step 2. Dig the hole two to three times as wide as the root-ball and just as deep.

Step 3. Loosen the root-ball if the roots are tight.

Step 3. Loosen the root-ball if the roots are tight.

Step 4. Set the plant in the hole and fill in the hole with an appropriate amendment depending on the composition of the soil.

If you have sandy soil, add peat and compost to the existing soil.

If the soil is clay, then blend compost with it.

At "Fruit Basket Flower-Land" - we use and sell a Michigan product called "DairyDoo" for use when or if the soil is clay or compacted.

We use DairyDoo if the soil is clay or compacted

Step 5. Set the plant in the hole as straight as possible.

Step 5 - Set the plant in the hole as straight as possible.

Step 6. Back-fill until the soil is level to the ground, and create a little reservoir around it for water.

Step 6. Back-fill until the soil is level to the ground, and create a little reservoir around it for water.

Step 7. Add some mulch to the top of the soil to keep the water in and the roots protected from any extreme changes in temperature or water.

Step 7. Add some mulch to the top of the soil to keep the water in and the roots protected from any extreme changes in temperature or water. 

Article by Shane Teelander - October, 2012

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park Panorama View From the Bottom Watershed

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park Panorama View From the Bottom Watershed and the images are from an iphone5.

About 500 yards south of 76th Street (on the East Beltline/M-37) on the east side of the road there is a hidden Jewell of a park.

The owner of this website purchased this property from an uncle (Uncle Paul Ruehs) whose father homesteaded the land in the mid 1800's.

Fred Ruehs and his family at one time owned 1000 acres of land in the Caledonia area and Fred's family donated the property where the Fred Reuhs park now is located in Alaska Michigan at the Thornapple River.

The "bottom-land" of this property is a natural watershed where rain waters wash from the surrounding hills and farmlands as the water drains into this pretty spot.

A park is now located in this watershed and the pictures below show another Outdoors Treasure in Michigan.

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park Sign

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park Sign

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park Culvert that Runs Under M-37/East Beltline

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park Culvert that Runs Under M-37/East Beltline

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park View From the Bottom Watershed

Caledonia Michigan Hidden Park View From the Bottom Watershed

Article by Alan Teelander - July, 2012

Boundary Waters Pictures

My friend Mike and I set out for the Boundary Waters June - 2012 and these are some of the pictures from that trip.

Boundary Waters Pictures - the start of the adventure

From about 30 miles north of Ely, Minnesota, we started our adventure.

Boundary Waters Pictures The start of the journey looks like this

The river trip to the first portage was simple and easy paddling....

Boundary Waters Pictures - Views to live for..

One of the beautiful scenes from the Boundary Waters...

Boundary Waters Pictures of a Deep Gorge

Looking down on the falls near the start of the trip...

Boundary Waters Pictures of the Starting Point of the Trip

Boundary Waters Pictures of the a Typical View

Boundary Waters Pictures of one of the many campsites

On the trip, we used 4 Duluth Backpacks.

They have been on several trips, they are made in the USA and have a lifetime guarantee.

They come in several colors and cost around $230. Click on this link or the picture above if you want more information.

Boundary Waters Pictures - massive rocks that seem more like mountains

Boundary Waters Pictures - massive rocks that seem more like mountains...

Throughout this page we will be showing the gear we used on this trip.

Proper gear and technology is critical to your safety if you take a trip to this area.

Boundary Waters Pictures - This Kevlar Canoe was rented and Mike owned the other one we used

Boundary Waters Pictures - This Kevlar Canoe was rented and Mike owned the other one we used.

These canoes are made in the USA of Kevlar, they are 16 foot long, they are the very best you can buy - but are very expensive to purchase.

We suggest that you rent one from an outfitter in Ely, Minnesota for a couple hundred dollars if you are not going to use it often.

Boundary Waters Pictures - This is around the 4th portage and it was very unique

Boundary Waters Pictures - This is around the 4th portage and it was very unique.

The images above and below show the portage pulling a large DNR boat up the hill and dropping on the other side of the portage.

I am told that there are more than one of these portages within the Boundary Waters area.

Motors are allowed on the Canadian side of Lac La Croix and we even saw a Ford F250 (below) floating on a barge that had to have come through this portage.

Boundary Waters Pictures Ford F250

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart Pricing

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart DNR Boat

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart DNR Boat with Canoes

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart DNR WorkSkiff going to the north side

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart DNR WorkSkiff going to the water on the north side

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart coming back up from the north side

Boundary Waters Pictures Rail Cart coming back up from the north side.

A gas pulley system pulled the boats up from either side and gravity dropped the cart to the other side.

The man who ran the Rail Cart told of of some ancient pictographs (below) from Indians that were just up the lake on the right side.

The images were taken with an inexpensive 12.1 megapixel Vivitar camera that cost around $52 and the images are actually pretty good.

The Boundary Waters is a rough place so unless you are a pro, leave the good camera home and pack a camera like this in a waterproof bag.

We left the Boundary Waters 2 days early because I happened to have a Midland HH50 Pocket Weather Radio with me.

It was a last minute decision to bring it but it kept us ahead of the storms and the day after we left the waters, the huge flooding of storm June 2012 hit the Duluth and northern Minnesota area.

We got out just in time because of this radio, we moved our camps because we knew the windows of good and bad weather.

Costing less than $15, this little radio is a must for any wilderness camping adventure.

All of our food and the products we used on the trip are at the top-right in the Amazon section.

We hand-picked these products because they worked well for us and we suggest them for your trip.

Boundary Waters Pictures of Indian Pictographs

Boundary Waters Pictures of Indian Pictographs 

Michigan Indian Mounds I read a lot about Michigan and it's history and I remember reading of Indian Mounds located near the lakes of Cadillac and Mitchell near Cadillac, Michigan.

On a September 2012 fishing trip with my buddy "Garrett", a retired US Marine Captain, we were blown off Lake Mitchell and decided to go golfing.

Cadillac Country Club 

 

We ended up at the historic 110 year old Cadillac Country Club and they let us play a round of golf on their beautiful course.

The second hole is below:

1st Hole Cadillac Country Club Golf Course

A second image of the course is below - all of the course is mature, beautiful, fair yet challenging.

Cadillac Country Club Golf Course

We were enjoying the course and at the turn we decided to visit the clubhouse, and then start the back nine.

I happened to ask the person working the clubhouse about the history of the course as I remembered being on the course when I was around 7 or 8 years old with my Dad.

I don't remember a lot about the course from back then except for the large number of Acorns that were all over the place. We did indeed see a lot of Acorns!

The person said that there was a lot of history and that we should look at the course as we reached the 200 yard mark of the 12th and 14th fairways.

He stated that as they were improving the course many decades ago, they stumbled onto some bones and artifacts and immediately stopped their work and called in some archaeologists.

 

It was confirmed that they had stumbled onto an old burial ground and that the graves dated back to around 1,000 years ago.

The work was then devoted to the preservation of the grounds and the fairways were diverted away from the burial grounds.

The image below (Camera aimed to the west) is of Garrett standing next to these sacred burial grounds.

Indian Mounds - Cadillac Country Club

In the picture you can see a yellow truck on M55.

About 100 yards ahead of that yellow truck in the distance (heading west) is a gas station where the "Bears" Ice Cream shop used to be.

You can turn around there, come back and and park on the side of the road to view the mounds from the M55 road.

Below are more images of 2 of the 3 Indian Burial Mounds.

Cadillac, Michigan Indian Mounds

The holes on the course were all very interesting and we were honored to have been allowed to play this fine course knowing that the Country Club Board did their best so many years ago to preserve these sacred grounds.

Indian Mounds near Cadillac Michigan

Winds were gusting to around 35 mph that day and hole number 16, a short par 3, just chewed us up.

If you remember the movie "Tin Cup", that how I performed on that hole and why "Tin Cup" is now a verb.

If you get a chance to drive in the Cadillac, Lakes area and you are not able to play a round of golf at the Cadillac Country Club, you can see the burial grounds from the M55 road. 

On our little golf outing, we used my Garmin Approach S1 GPS Golf Watch to help us navigate the course. 

I golf in a scramble every Monday during the summer and this little GPS watch is compares very well to the lazer devices out there and all I have to do is look at it to know front, middle and back distances.

Garrett used Taylor Made clubs and I played Callaway Golf RAZR X Clubs. Cadillac Country Club 5510 E M 55, Cadillac, MI (231) 775-9442